(Source: flawlessvevo)

mediamattersforamerica:

"Let men be men": Fox hosts eagerly agreed with the NY Post article that claimed “catcalls are flattering.” 

A few more gems from this segment

  • "They mean it in a nice way."
  • "It’s nice to get compliments."
  • "As long as you don’t come within arms length, it’s fine."

But for many women, catcalls are humiliating and degrading. Some blame themselves, wondering what they could have done differently to prevent it. And the consequences can considerably affect a person’s social behavior and habits, as women report they avoid eye contact and walking alone in public, or change their outfits or routes to avoid harassment.”  

In reality, this is no small problem. According to Stop Street Harassment, “at least 65% of women have experienced catcalls, leers, and unwanted sexual propositions,” disproportionately affecting those with low incomes, women of color, and the LGBTQ community. And while there are federal laws protecting women from workplace harassment, street harassment is addressed on a state-by-state basis.

Let’s bring some voices of reason into this discussion:

Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY:

Catcalling does not mean you are beautiful, smart, strong or interesting. Catcalling means a stranger values you so little he doesn’t care if he makes you feel uncomfortable or threatened.

Margaret Eby, Brooklyn Magazine:

Catcalling is about control, not about your cute shorts. It’s an assertion that women are just visitors in a male space, there to be assessed by appearance and summarily dismissed or flirted with.

Ashley Ross, TIME:

To legitimize catcalling is to give voice to those who don’t deserve it: the man who told me he wanted to perform oral sex on me, the man who said he wanted it the other way around and the man who said he could have me if he wanted me.

The dehumanizing culture of catcalling must stop, but conservative media outlets like Fox aren’t helping. It’s up to us all to educate ourselves about the harms of harassment, so that women can truly be free in the streets of America.

raygorartshit:

Bisexual Frustration: Everyone is Hot and I’m Really Bad at Handling It - my autobiography

raygorartshit:

Bisexual Frustration: Everyone is Hot and I’m Really Bad at Handling It - my autobiography

bogleech:

florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)

The constant wobbling as they move is a part of their disguise, making it seem as though the “leaf” is only moving because of a light breeze.

If you blow on one it will also shake around in the hopes of matching any actual surrounding leaves

#bugs

#bugs

fishingboatproceeds:

I don’t really understand how that is a question up for discussion on television news. I mean, even putting aside the gajillion ways that white people are privileged by, for instance, being able to think that whiteness is “normal,” studying world history from Eurocentric perspectives,  and etc etc:
- White people are less likely to be arrested for the same crime than black people, and black people serve longer (much longer!) sentences than white people.
- Marijuana use is similar among black and white populations in the U.S., but young African Americans are more than THREE TIMES more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession or use than white Americans. 
- Racial bias in hiring in the U.S. is well-documented and persistent.
- African American students are far more likely to be punished in schools, even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than their white peers.
- Even after accounting for reasons like education disparity, geographical distribution, and occupation, there is a persistent wage gap: White people make are paid more than African Americans due to racial discrimination. 
- White people in the U.S. on average have lower mortgage rates than African Americans.
White privilege is a fact of every facet of American life. I realize I’m mostly preaching to the choir here, but this is not a political issue or a subject for debate. It is well-documented and irrefutable.

fishingboatproceeds:

I don’t really understand how that is a question up for discussion on television news. I mean, even putting aside the gajillion ways that white people are privileged by, for instance, being able to think that whiteness is “normal,” studying world history from Eurocentric perspectives,  and etc etc:

- White people are less likely to be arrested for the same crime than black people, and black people serve longer (much longer!) sentences than white people.

- Marijuana use is similar among black and white populations in the U.S., but young African Americans are more than THREE TIMES more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession or use than white Americans. 

- Racial bias in hiring in the U.S. is well-documented and persistent.

- African American students are far more likely to be punished in schools, even though they are not much more likely to break school rules than their white peers.

- Even after accounting for reasons like education disparity, geographical distribution, and occupation, there is a persistent wage gap: White people make are paid more than African Americans due to racial discrimination. 

- White people in the U.S. on average have lower mortgage rates than African Americans.

White privilege is a fact of every facet of American life. I realize I’m mostly preaching to the choir here, but this is not a political issue or a subject for debate. It is well-documented and irrefutable.

(Source: twitter.com)

““White knighting” is a pejorative term bigots use to undermine such actions from men who are using their voices for support, not for condemnation and misogyny. Bigots use it to claim men are supporting women in the hopes of sleeping with women. Because, apparently, that’s the only reason you would ever want to treat someone as a person.”
ninjabrians:

YELLS LOUDLY BC ARIN

ninjabrians:

YELLS LOUDLY BC ARIN